ILO ILO

iloilo

 

Set in Singapore during the 1997 Asian financial crisis, Ilo Ilo chronicle the story of the bond between a 10-year-old Singaporean boy, Jiale and his caretaker, Teresa from the Philippines — while his parents struggle to overcome their already strained relationship as well as the financial crisis. Teresa and Jiale soon formed a bond and continues to develop and she becomes an unspoken part of their family  ILO ILO chronicles the relationship between a family of three and their newly arrived Filipino maid, Teresa, who has come like many other Filipino women in search of a better life.

The entire family needs to adapt to the presence of this stranger, which further threatens their already strained relationship. Still, Teresa and Jiale, the young and troublesome boy she cares for, soon form a bond. Their unique connection continues to develop and soon she becomes an unspoken part of the family. But this is 1997 and the Asian Financial Crisis is starting to be felt in all the region.

Ilo Ilo (Chinese: Ilo Ilo ?????) is a 2013 Singaporean family film. The debut feature of director Anthony Chen, the film features an international cast, including Singaporean actor Chen Tianwen, Malaysian actress Yeo Yann Yann and Filipino actress Angeli Bayani.
Ilo Ilo was first released at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival as part of the Directors’ Fortnight on 19 May 2013.At the festival, the film was awarded the Camera d’Or award, thus becoming the first Singaporean feature film to win an award at the Cannes Film Festival. The film has been selected as the Singaporean entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 86th Academy Awards.

CAST
Chen Tianwen as Teck, the father
Yeo Yann Yann as Hwee Leng, the mother
Koh Jia Ler as Jiale
Angeli Bayani as Teresa
Production[edit]

Partially sponsored by Ngee Ann Polytechnic and the Singapore Film Commission, the film’s budget is estimated to be around $700,000.
Reception.

Ilo Ilo received positive reviews at the Cannes Film Festival. At its debut screening, the film received a 15-minute standing ovation from the audience, despite a technical glitch which interrupted the screening of the film. The film was later awarded the Camera d’Or award, an award which recognizes the best debut feature film in the competition.[5] It received six nominations at the Golden Horse Film Festival and Awards and won 4, namely Best Film, Best New Director, Best Original Screenplay and Best Supporting Actress for Yeo Yann Yann.

Awards

Film
May 2013, Camera d’Or, Canne Film Festival (Canne, France)
Sep 2013, Best Feature, 11th Pacific Meridian Film Festival (Vladivostok, Russia)
Sep 2013, NETPAC Prize, 11th Pacific Meridian Film Festival (Vladivostok, Russia)
Sep 2013, Grand Jury Prize, 10th Jameson Cinefest(Miskloc, Hungary)
Sep 2013, FIPRESCI Prize, 10th Jameson Cinefest(Miskloc, Hungary)
Sep 2013, International Ecumenical Jury Prize, 10th Jameson Cinefest(Miskloc, Hungary)
Oct 2013, Best Narrative Feature Film, 22nd Philadelphia Film Festival (Philadelphia, United States)
Oct 2013, First Feature “Sutherland Award”, 57th British Film Institute London Film Festival (London, United Kingdom)
Nov 2013, Best Original Screenplay, 50th Golden Horse Awards (Taipei)
Nov 2013, Best Feature Film, 50th Golden Horse Awards (Taipei)

Individual
Sep 2013, Best Actress (Yeo Yann Yann), 11th Pacific Meridian Film Festival (Vladivostok, Russia)
Sep 2013, Best Actor (Koh Jia Ler), 9th Eurasia Film Festival, (Almaty, Kazakhstan)
Oct 2013, Best Actress (Yeo Yann Yann), 15th Mumbai International Film Festival (Mumbai, India)
Oct 2013, Best Director (Anthony Chen), 15th Mumbai International Film Festival (Mumbai, India)
Nov 2013, New Talent Award, 10th Hong Kong Asian Film Festival (Hong Kong, China)
Nov 2013, Best Supporting Actress (Yeo Yann Yann), 50th Golden Horse Awards (Taipei)
Nov 2013, Best New Director (Anthony Chen), 50th Golden Horse Awards (Taipei)

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